Handicapped Grooming and Ordinary Tasks

Personal hygiene is keeping the body clean. It helps to prevent the spread of germs and is especially important for the disabled who may need help with this task. Grooming is caring for teeth, fingernails and hair. Some of these activities would be styling hair, shaving, trimming and painting fingernails.

Maintaining good health also includes the following areas: nutrition, leisure, recreation, sleep, and exercise. As you can see, there are many factors that contribute to feeling and looking good. Feeling and looking good is important to each individual’s emotional and physical wellbeing.

If you are disabled it can be a challenge with upper body tasks such as brushing your teeth, applying hand lotion or holding a hairbrush much less tying your shoes, or cutting your meat with a knife or even using a pair of scissors.

If you have a disability that involves your feet or legs, you may find it difficult to get in and out of the bathtub or have a manicure or pedicure. There are many personal care aids available for someone who is disabled; hair dryer stands, toothpaste squeezers, lotion applicators, one-handed nail clippers and self-inspection mirrors are just a few of the items that a person with a disability might use to perform self-grooming activities.

I would think that one of the most frustrating things for many people with a disability is the loss of independence. Everyone wants to look their best but it’s difficult to look your best when you can’t brush your teeth, comb your hair or have proper hygiene. There are many grooming equipment items that can help you with everyday grooming so you can take care of these things for yourself so you have a feeling of independence and you don’t have to rely on someone to help you with these tasks. There are many health aspects to good hygiene. It makes you feel good to be neat and clean and gives a feeling of self-worth.

I came up with a list of these items on the website mentioned below:

A stand for your hair dryer could be a useful item if you have trouble holding onto items. This item could provide a semblance of normalcy and allow you to do this task for yourself. Hair brushes for the disabled that have an extended handle helps those who are unable to reach that far. They often come in 12 or 14 inches in length. Brushing your hair regularly helps stimulate the circulation in the scalp.

If you are unable to grasp a regular hair brush due to limited hand strength or arthritis, there are universal hand clips that you can stick to the hair brush. One side will velcro to the brush and the other is a clip that you put over your hand.

Taking care of your eyes is important. Getting the eyedropper to drop directly in the center of your eye without blinking can be difficult but eyedropper guides make it much easier. The guide fits over your eye and prevents your eye from blinking. No more missing and hitting the eyelid.

Good dental hygiene not only prevents tooth decay, it can promote overall health by preventing gingivitis, or gum disease. There are toothpaste squeezers that can help.

Feet scrubbers that can be attached to the shower floor and can remove dirt and dead skin when you move your feet back and forth.

Dry skin is uncomfortable and more likely to become irritated or break down under pressure, so the ability to apply lotion is important.

If you need access to products for people with a disability there are grooming aids readily available from on-line specialty stores and internet sites. There are many handicap grooming aids out there and it is almost certain you will find one that will meet your needs.